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Talk about a trip you took out to Anza Borrego

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rockhopper
rockhopper
Posts: 599


10/12/2015
rockhopper
rockhopper
Posts: 599
Found these grinding rocks on a local hike last week about 2.5 miles from my house. I brought my camera out this time. They are located about 2 miles from the ocean under heavy over growth. They were probably known about by the old timers in the area, but I "discovered" them again while cutting a trail through the scrub oak along a ridge line along a old forgotten trail. btw it was 94 deg at the coast!

Grinding holes cleaned out. I covered them back up with leaves and branches and are completely hidden again :-)
Also note rock eroded away from grinding hole. Old!


Some you tube clips,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-huTCN6Nojc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ksDDzuMVNGU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PrX6TySP9I
edited by rockhopper on 10/12/2015
edited by rockhopper on 10/12/2015
edited by rockhopper on 10/12/2015
edited by rockhopper on 10/12/2015
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ziphius
ziphius
Posts: 890


10/13/2015
ziphius
ziphius
Posts: 890
Cool stuff rockhopper. I too wonder how old they are compared with the ones in the desert. A lot more weathering near the coast... but these are obviously a lot more weathered than the ones you find at Mission Trails Park, which should have about the same amount of weathering. Looks like a different type of rock than I'm used to seeing morteros on, maybe it is 'softer' rock.

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rockhopper
rockhopper
Posts: 599


10/13/2015
rockhopper
rockhopper
Posts: 599
Jim,
Yes, rock is a "hard" sandstone but softer than the usual granite. Most of the rock slabs have took a tumble down the slope so some of the grind hole are now on near vertical rock faces. The last youtube video shows that and gives a clue to its age? My guess is pre-Columbian?? Anyway it was a neat find in a area with a lot of shell dumps, fire hearths and rock chippings.
Cheers
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ziphius
ziphius
Posts: 890


10/13/2015
ziphius
ziphius
Posts: 890
These coastal sites that you've shared with us a few times (keep 'em coming!) seem to be devoid of classic 'points', but have an abundance of chipped stone. Any theories?
edited by ziphius on 10/13/2015

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tommy750
tommy750
Posts: 984


10/13/2015
tommy750
tommy750
Posts: 984
Very nice find, rockhopper. Glad to see people out and about in the far western part of the park smile
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rockhopper
rockhopper
Posts: 599


10/13/2015
rockhopper
rockhopper
Posts: 599
Jim
Theories of lack of classic points. Well, IMHO vegetation! As opposed to the wide open desert areas. Also consider 90% of the coastal areas have been bulldozed and developed and 99% of the remaining pre-Spanish contact evidence is buried or submerged off shore and beneath lagoons. I did locate a stone tool chipping area and a few arrow head points about 4 miles from the coast so they are still out there but like finding a needle in a haystack.
tommy750
yes I think of the coast to desert as "our" park
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